Mothers Of Lost Children – Indiana

Support for Noncustodial Indiana Moms

Archive for February 2010

Family Court Crisis

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Two very important videos on the crisis happening in the family courts, from The Center for Judicial Excellence.   This perfectly illustrates what is happening in the family courts in Indiana, and the problem with the judges, the court-appointed psychologists, co-parenting counselors, Guardians ad Litem, minor’s counsel, custody evaluators, and any other associated court whores who will bleed a family dry and suck the lifeblood out of it’s victims.  Well, they keep themselves pretty well employed in Indianapolis.

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Attention Indiana Legislature: Read About The Shared Parenting Disaster in Australia Before You Do it to Us

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This is from the Daily Telegraph in Australia, where they are already experiencing problems with forced shared parenting.  The “shared parenting” advocates in Indiana, at least some of them, believe that even an abusive parent deserves shared parenting.  This is horrifying to us that see our children abused and the abusers are applauded by the family courts of Indiana and often rewarded with full custody of the children.  This is often the starting point – shared parenting – but the goal is to get out of child support and gain full custody.

Children ‘at risk’ in shared parenting

THE practice of splitting child custody equally between divorced parents is being questioned after a major study found one in five parents in the arrangement believed it was not working.

An estimated 90,000 Australian children are in shared-care arrangements under a policy introduced by the Howard government with the support of fathers’ rights groups.

But the largest study of the family law system, released yesterday, found a presumption of a 50-50 split was putting some children into violent homes.

Attorney-General Robert McClelland said yesterday a “misunderstanding” that parents were guaranteed equal time under the law was to blame. “Bush lawyers or pub lawyers are providing advice to people going through the system that is wrong,” he said.

“We are now in a situation where people have resolved cases where the best interest of children may have not been regarded.”

Family laws introduced in 2006 included a presumption of equal parental responsibility, widely interpreted as an even-time split.

But researchers said yesterday parents had agreed to shared care even when they did not have to. Other parents were disillusioned because they were not granted a perfectly equal arrangement.

And violence was not being addressed in court because of the threat of paying full court costs if the allegations were not proven.

Mens Rights Agency director Sue Price said any shift away from equal time was a “disastrous” return to the old-fashioned notion that fathers didn’t count.

“It is not good for children not to have both mum and dad in their life,” Ms Price said.

The Australian Institute of Family Studies report, which took three years and surveyed 28,000 people, found about one in 20 children in shared care had parents who reported violence as a risk.

“There are significant concerns around the minority of families where there are safety concerns,” institute director Professor Alan Hayes said. Where safety concerns were reported by parents, children suffered but they suffered the most when they were in shared care agreements, he said.

But researchers found “overwhelming” community support for the concept of shared parenting.

Ms Price said violence by women was ignored in the three reports released yesterday.